The Clyde Valley Web Site, Scotland

Failte! It is

in The Clyde Valley, The Garden of Scotland.

You are Exploring Scotland - The Clyde Valley and visiting Stonehouse.

Barrhead
Biggar
Carluke
Carmichael
Carnwath
Coatbridge
Cumbernauld
Douglas
Eaglesham
East Kilbride
Giffnock
Glasgow
Gourock
Hamilton
Kilsyth
Lanark
Lochwinnoch
Motherwell
New Lanark
Port Glasgow
Renfrew
Shotts
Stonehouse
Strathaven



Featured Site
Balfron Heritage Group

The heritage site about Balfron, Stirlingshire.

Your site could be here!

Stonehouse

... welcomes you to the heart of The Avon Valley, Scotland.

Stonehouse
Spectacle E's Falls

Stonehouse is by no means a new settlement - stone cists have been found indicating that this scenic part of the Avon Valley was inhabited as long ago as 2000BC. These stone cists were found at St. Ninian's graveyard in the town and in Patrickholm.

Stonehouse Weavers Cottages
Weavers' Cottages.
The centre of the village is a conservation area, which includes the weaver's cottages. Weaving was an important industry here for a time, up until the 1800s. After the demise of weaving, coal later became the major industry in Stonehouse. This lasted until Canderigg Colliery closed in 1958.
There are a number of historical interest sites in and around Stonehouse. The records of the town go back to the ninth century!

Sodom Hill - the site of a battle in the time of the seventeenth century Covenanters, and Double Dykes - a fortified position rumoured to have been around during the Iron Age, are just two of the town's historic features. Double Dykes can be found where the Avon River and the Cander River meet. At Avonholm standing stones can be found.

Stonehouse Market Cross
Market Cross.

The Bloodstone


Saint Ninian's Church and Martyr's Gravestone
The ruins of St. Ninian's Church are surrounded by a graveyard. One of the memorials here is to a martyr of the Battle of Drumclog, covenanter James Thomson of Tanhill. He was killed by Bloody Graham of Clavers during the 1679 skirmish. This memorial stone is known locally as the Bloodstone or Bloodstane. The comes from the myth that if you insert your finger into the skull's mouth on the memorial, it would run with blood when you withdraw your finger.

The Bloodstone superstition can be explained by the red ochre seam that runs through the grey sandstone.

... continued >>>

 

MSN Internet Access
Please support The Clyde Valley Web Site. Thank you.

Great gift ideas from The Biggar Department Store
Scotland from the Air

Gaelic - English and English - Gaelic Dictionary

This is a fascinating and up-to-date guide to the Celtic language of the Western Highlands and islands of Scotland. Once the predominant language of the area, it has survived the vicissitudes of reformers and Anglophones to become once again an important part of Scotland's culture as we enter the new millennum. [hardback]

203-001-01 Our Price 8.00



Show Cart
Prices include Packing and VAT where applicable. Shipping is additional.
Purchasing this helps support this web site.
LinkExchange
LinkExchange Member

Encyclopedia Alba & The Clyde Valley Web Site © Biggar-Net 1996 - 2001.
Version 10.0. Legal Information.
Credits.